Posts for tag: dry feet

By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
February 01, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: foot care   dry feet  
At-Home Care for Dry FeetDry, flaky feet are incredibly common, particularly during the cold, winter months; however, if you find yourself dealing with dry or cracked feet throughout the year, especially around the heels, you may be wondering what you can do about it. Instead of just waiting until your feet become dry and flaky, your podiatrist can provide you with some easy skin care tips to keep your feet supple and free from dry skin all year long.
 
Wear Appropriate, Supportive Footwear

Certain shoes can leave you prone to cracked heels and dry skin due to friction from wearing loose-fitted shoes. People who wear sandals and other open-heeled shoes are more at risk for developing cracked heels. Instead, opt for closed-heeled shoes that fit properly and provide support.
 
Lose Excess Weight

If you are overweight, you may be surprised to discover that this could be contributing to your dry, cracked heels. This is because your feet take on all of your weight while standing, walking, and running. By safely dropping that excess weight through a healthy diet and regular exercise you can alleviate some of the pressure placed on your heels to reduce the risk of cracking.
 
Avoid Hot Showers

While we know just how luxurious it feels to stand in a steaming hot shower, especially during the winter months, this could be contributing to dry skin on your feet and cracked heels. If this is something you deal with regularly you may look at your current bathing or showering ritual to see if that could be the culprit. Simply use warm and not hot water, which can strip the skin of the oils it needs to stay moist.
 
Apply a Moisturizer

You should moisturize your feet every day to prevent dry skin from happening in the first place. Moisturizers that contain lactic acid, glycerin, or petroleum jelly can help to lock in moisture in your feet. Moisturize every time you get out of the shower and throughout the day, especially before going to bed. If you are prone to very dry, cracked feet, you may wish to moisturize and then wear socks to bed.
 
If these simple home measures don’t work, then you’ll want to consult your podiatrist to see if they can recommend a prescription-strength moisturizer or cream to reduce dryness and inflammation. Since dry, cracked feet can sometimes be a sign of an underlying health problem like diabetes, it’s a good idea to see your doctor if you’re dealing with this problem regularly.
 
While dry skin isn’t usually a concern for healthy individuals, if you have diabetes, you’ll need to be extra careful when it comes to treating even minor problems like dry, cracked, or flaky skin. To be on the safe side, it’s best to speak with a qualified podiatrist to find out how to treat cracked skin to prevent infection. Call your foot doctor today.
By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
October 28, 2016

With Halloween right around the corner, things are starting to look pretty spooky, with witches on brooms, black cats and ghoulishly grinning jack-o-lanterns perched on every front porch. Footcare, however, should not be frightening! At New England Foot & Ankle Specialists we recognize that medical jargon can make a condition sound more alarming than it actually is. Our podiatrists: Dr. George A. Abboud, Dr. Brian D. Tedesco, Dr. Carl Conui, Dr. Kimberly Thurmond and Dr. Dennis Tuck will always try to explain your foot issues in a way that is easy to understand. If you have questions, just ask. Below are three conditions whose names make them sound a lot more serious than they actually are:

Xerosis—is the medical term for very dry skin. Common causes are showering more than once a day, using very hot water when bath or using laundry detergents or soaps that contain ingredients that dry the skin. Using a rich moisturizer a few times a day will usually eliminate the problem.

Tinea Pedis—you know this condition as Athlete’s foot. Symptoms include itchy, red, dry skin, especially between the toes. Left untreated, the infection can spread to other parts of the feet and even cause oozing blisters to form. The best way to prevent this irritating disorder is to not go barefoot in public places since the fungal infection is spread by direct contact.

Onychomycosis—is more commonly known as a fungal toenail infection. Typically, the nail will get thick and brittle and even start to crumble at the edges. It also will turn a darker color. Like athlete’s foot, fungal nail infections are the result of coming directly into contact with the fungus—sharing footwear, walking barefoot in a public place or using a footbath at a nail salon that has not been properly sanitized are all possible ways the infection could be spread.

What’s important to remember is that anytime you notice something unusual or uncomfortable with your toes, feet or ankles it’s best to make an appointment at our Reading office to get it evaluated. Little problems can grow into bigger problems if not treated promptly.



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New England & Ankle Specialists

(781) 944-4044
30 New Crossing Road Suite 311 Reading, MA 01876