Posts for tag: diabetic feet

By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
June 03, 2019
Category: Diabetic Foot Care
Tags: diabetic feet  

Diabetic feet need special care because of decreased circulation, neuropathy, joint deterioration, and more. While your primary care physician may guide you on blood sugar control, medications, a healthy diet, and active lifestyle, your podiatrist assesses and treats how your feet and ankles function everyday and for the long term. Enlist their help in the health maintenance of your diabetic feet.

Keeping ahead of neuropathy and avoiding amputation

Those are two key goals of diabetic foot care. Your podiatrist will want to see you regularly to assess the color, temperature, sensation, function, and shape of your feet and ankles, noting any developing problems. Early detection of circulation issues, nerve degeneration (neuropathy), and deformities, such as hammertoes, bunions, and Charcot Foot, are key.

Your podiatric foot examination will include an eye-on inspection of your skin (color, temperature, texture, and integrity). Your foot doctor also may perform gait analysis to watch for changes in how you walk. Sometimes a podiatrist orders X-ray imaging or an MRI to view the internal structure of the foot and/or ankle.

Remember, that foot ulcers are the primary threat to the overall health and well-being of the diabetic, says the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Untreated, they may lead to complications so severe amputation is the only option.

What can you do to treat your diabetic feet?

  1. Be proactive. Inspect your feet daily, looking redness or skin breakdown.
  2. Wash and dry your feet daily.
  3. Trim your toenails carefully using a clean clippers. Trim straight across and not too short to avoid ingrown toenails.
  4. Wear shoes at all times--even indoors--to avoid injury.
  5. Wear clean, well-fitting, moisture-wicking socks.
  6. Keep your weight and blood sugars within normal range.
  7. Get in-office treatment of calluses and corns, says the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.
  8. Avoid all forms of tobacco.
  9. Report any changes to your foot doctor as soon as possible.
  10. See your podiatrist every six months or as he or she directs.

Healthy feet and a healthy you

Podiatric health is so important, but especially to the diabetic. So stay in touch with your foot doctor, and be routinized in your foot care for better long-term health.

 

A new device may allow Diabetic patients  to check for nerve damage on their feet via detecting sweat. A stick-on pad color changes from blue to pink when the feet are in good health. However, the color does not change if there are any potential nerve complications, according to Roger Dobson of DailyMail.  

A new study at the Oxford University examined the results of about 3,000 subjects, finding the device to be 86 percent accurate according to DailyMail. “This is an exciting innovation. In association with a yearly foot screen and referral to the podiatry services, this will reduce the risk of amputations, said Stella Vig, chair of the Lond Diabetic Foot Network. “At present, up to 50 per cent of amputations may be preventable - no patient should ignore their feet.”

It is important for Diabetics to receive proper foot care for their needs. If you have diabetes, see podiatrist Dr. Brian Tedesco of Complete Foot & Ankle Care. Dr. Tedesco will treat your podiatric concerns.

 

 

 

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people of all ages each year. Diabetes damages blood vessels in many parts of the body, including the feet. When damage occurs to nerves in the feet, they may be unable to send the proper signals to the peripheral nervous system, resulting in a condition known as neuropathy. Once a diabetic patient develops neuropathy, it is imperative that the feet are well taken care of to avoid possible amputation of the feet.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet
- Regularly check your feet for bruises or sores.
- Wear socks that fit your feet; socks shouldn’t be tight.
- Wear properly fitting shoes that are comfortable.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their Hemoglobin A1C levels as this test lets the physician know how well the blood sugar levels have been controlled during the past 3 months. It is important to keep the blood sugar levels in a normal range (70-110mg/dl). It is advisable to visit a podiatrist if the diabetic patient is experiencing any conditions involving the feet.

For more information about Diabetic Foot Care, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices in Reading, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Diabetic Foot Care



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