Posts for tag: cavus foot

By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
August 30, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: cavus foot  
High Arches in ChildrenWhen babies are born they are born with flat feet. Typically the arches of the feet don’t develop until children are 3-4 years old; however, sometimes the arches of the feet develop higher than they should, which can cause the feet to flex. This is known as cavus foot and this problem typically occurs within the first 10 years of a child’s life. Since this condition can impact mobility you must see a podiatrist if this is something you think your child might be dealing with.

The Problem with Cavus Foot

Cavus foot needs to be addressed right away by a podiatrist, as this condition can lead to a variety of issues for your child. Cavus foot is more likely to lead to imbalances within the feet, which in turn can also impact the function of the ankle, legs, hips, and even lower back. Children and teens with cavus foot may be more likely to deal with aches, pains, and strains within the feet, ankles, legs, and hips. This condition can also lead to metatarsalgia, Achilles tendonitis, and chronic ankle sprains.

Causes of Cavus Foot

In many cases, a muscle or nerve disorder that impacts how the muscles function causes cavus foot. This leads to imbalances that cause the distinctive high arches of this condition. Of course, other conditions such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, muscular dystrophy, and spina bifida can also increase the chances of developing cavus foot.

Treating Cavus Foot

You must be watching your little ones as they start to walk to see if you notice any differences in how they move. Catching these issues early offers your child the best chance at improved mobility and less risk for developing foot problems later on. Your podiatrist may work together with a neurologist to pinpoint whether a nerve disorder could be the underlying cause.

Once your foot specialist determines the root cause of your child’s cavus foot then they can map out a customized treatment plan. Milder cases may benefit from more conservative treatment options such as custom orthotics and arch supports; however, surgery is often necessary to correct this problem.

Any issues with mobility, particularly in children, should be addressed and assessed as quickly as possible. Turn to a podiatrist that also specializes in providing pediatric podiatry to children and teens, as they will be able to provide the most thorough treatment plan for your little one.
By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
October 19, 2016
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Orthotics   cavus foot   high arches  

Do you experience pain when you are walking or standing? Do you have calluses on the ball or side of your foot or on your heel? Does your ankle feel unstable and tend to turn inwards unexpectedly? At New England Foot & Ankle Specialists we often see these symptoms in patients that have a condition known as Cavus Foot, which is characterized by an overly high arch that is visible when standing.

Causes

Cases of Cavus Foot generally fall into two categories. In the first, the overly high arch is due to a structural defect that is most likely genetic. The other cause of this condition is a neurologic disorder or medical problem such as Charcot Marie Tooth disease, spina bifida, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, polio or stroke. It’s important to determine the correct cause of the Cavus Foot in order to determine the appropriate treatment.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Our podiatrists: Dr. George A. Abboud, Dr. Brian D. Tedesco, Dr. Carl Conui and Dr. Kimberly Thurmond will start by conducting a thorough examination of the foot. The foot doctor will want to take a detailed medical history. In searching for the cause of the high arch, the podiatrist may test the muscle strength of your foot, evaluate your walking pattern and possibly order x-rays. If the podiatrist suspects a neurologic cause of the Cavus Foot a consultation with a neurologist may be recommended.

If Cavus Foot is caused by a structural abnormality, it is unlikely to progress. Those cases resulting from a medical condition or neurologic condition usually worsen if left untreated. Fortunately, there are a number of non-surgical treatment options for Cavus Foot, including:

  • Changing your shoes—choose wider heels to increase balance and stability and high tops to provide ankle support.

  • Orthotic devices—cushioning and stability can both be gained through the use of orthotic devices.

  • Bracing—this can help keep the foot and ankle from turning.

If these treatments are not successful, the foot doctor may recommend surgery.

If you have an overly high arch or are experiencing symptoms of Cavus Foot, contact our Reading office for an appointment.



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New England & Ankle Specialists

(781) 944-4044
30 New Crossing Road Suite 311 Reading, MA 01876