Posts for: August, 2016

By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
August 25, 2016
Category: Foot Conditions

If the joints in your feet are inflamed, you’ll know it. The pain and stiffness will be evident with every step. August is Psoriasis Awareness Month and here at New England Foot & Ankle Specialists we want to give your patients the facts about how this disease can affect your joints. Although most people when they think of psoriasis think of a skin condition (red, scaly dry patches that itch and burn), another condition associated with this autoimmune disease is psoriatic arthritis. Here are some important facts about this condition and your feet:

  • Psoriatic arthritis usually affects joints closest to you toe and finger nails (distal joints) and that is why it often develops in the feet.

  • Psoriatic arthritis affects up to 30% of patients that have been diagnosed with psoriasis.

  • In approximately 85% of cases, psoriatic arthritis shows up after psoriasis but in 15% of the cases the arthritis precedes the skin condition.

  • The severity of your psoriasis does not correlate with the development of psoriatic arthritis—patients with very few skin lesions can still have their joints affected.

  • Some symptoms of psoriatic arthritis are similar to other types of joint disease: pain, stiffness and reduced range of motion. There are, however, often additional symptoms that are different: general fatigue, changes in the appearance of your toenails—nails may be pitted or separate from the nail bed and you may also experience redness and pain in your eye.

  • Psoriatic arthritis may appear slowly over time or come on suddenly with severe symptoms.

  • Sometimes the arthritis will develop in a joint that has been injured.

Perhaps the most important fact to know is that psoriatic arthritis can lead to permanent joint damage in as little as six months. That’s why early detection and treatment is essential. If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms, especially if you have already been diagnosed with psoriasis, contact our Reading office for an appointment as soon as possible. Our podiatrists, George A. Abboud, D.P.M., Brian D. Tedesco, D.P.M., Carl Conui, D.P.M., and Kimberly Thurmond, D.P.M. will do a complete examination of your foot and will help determine the cause and appropriate treatment of your joint pain.


By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
August 17, 2016
Category: Foot Care

At New England Foot & Ankle Specialists we treat a wide variety of toe, foot and ankle disorders. What we find is that one of the best “treatments” is prevention. Here are some basic guidelines for caring for your feet:

  • Practice good hygiene. Wash your feet daily and dry them completely, especially between your toes.

  • Wear the right shoe for the activity you are doing. If you are a serious athlete, buy shoes designed for your specific sport. Limit time in high heels.

  • Be sure all your shoes fit well. One of the biggest causes of foot problems is improperly fitting shoes. There should be at least a half inch between you longest toe and the inside of your shoe. Be sure shoes fit snugly in the heel and also that there are no places where the shoe rubs on your foot. Tip: shop for shoes at the end of the day—that’s when your foot tends to be at its largest. Do not wear shoes that are worn out and have lost their shape.

  • Keep toenails trimmed straight across. Don’t round or cut in the corners as this can lead to ingrown nails.

  • Limit the amount of time you walk barefoot to greatly reduce your risk of injury and infection. Be sure to wear flip flops or shower shoes in public places like gym showers and community pools to avoid athlete’s foot.

  • Apply sun block to your feet just as you would the rest of your body.

  • Try not to wear the same pair of shoes two days in a row.

  • Look your feet over regularly. If you notice changes in size, shape or color of your feet or nails or skin issues such as rashes, cracks, peeling or cuts that don’t seem to be healing or anything else unusual, make an appointment to see one of our podiatrists: Dr. George A. Abboud, Dr. Brian D. Tedesco, Dr. Carl Conui, or Dr. Kimberly Thurmond.

  • Remember, pain is never normal. If you have constant or regularly recurring pain in your foot or ankle, contact our Reading office for an evaluation.

You only get one set of feet! Take care of them and they’ll take you where you want to go for many years to come.


By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
August 10, 2016
Category: Proper Foot Care

Did you know that one of the biggest factors in preventing foot problems is choosing well-made shoes that fit properly? Here at New England Foot & Ankle Specialists we want to offer our patients some tips to take to the shoe store:

  1. Get your feet professionally measured each time you shop for shoes. As you age or if you are pregnant, your feet size can increase.

  2. Most people have one foot that is larger than the other. Always fit shoes to the larger foot.

  3. Be sure shoes are fitted both to the heel and your toes.

  4. Check that there is at least a half inch of space between your longest toe and the end of the shoe. When the shoe is all the way on your foot you should still be able to wiggle your toes freely.

  5. Shop for shoes at the end of the day. That’s when feet tend to be most swollen and at their largest size.

  6. Choose shoes with laces rather than slip-on designs for a more secure fit and to better accommodate orthotic devices, insoles or braces.

  7. Always try on both shoes and spend some time walking around in the store to make sure they are comfortable.

  8. Don’t buy heels that are higher than 2 inches. High heels force the toes into the toe box and squeeze them which can lead to toe deformities such as hammertoe.

  9. Check the inside of the shoe for loose stitching or bumps in the material that can cause irritation. This is especially important if you have a bunion or other foot deformity.

  10. If shoes feel tight or uncomfortable in the store, don’t buy them! A “break-in period” for shoes is a myth and will result in blisters and pain when you wear them.

If you are uncertain whether your foot condition requires special shoe accommodations contact either our Reading office at (781) 944-4044  for an appointment and let one of our podiatrists, George A. Abboud, D.P.M., Brian D. Tedesco, D.P.M., Carl Conui, D.P.M., or Kimberly Thurmond, D.P.M. examine your foot and make recommendations for the best shoes to protect your foot health.


By New England Foot & Ankle Specialists
August 03, 2016
Category: Foot Care

Did you know that according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) improper care of your feet during exercise is a factor in over 300 foot injuries and disorder? At New England Foot & Ankle Specialists we want our patients to be in good shape but not at the expense of your feet.  Here are some ways you can protect your podiatric health while you work out:

Get a Check Up: We’ve all heard how you should “consult your physician” before starting a new exercise program but many people neglect to realize that includes your feet. If you’ve had previous injuries or have existing conditions such as bunions or flat feet, your podiatrists can make specific recommendations regarding activities and footwear that will be less stressful on your trouble spots.

Listen to Your Feet: Pain is never normal. While you may experience sore muscles when you first start a new sport or program, stabbing pain, extreme pain or pain that doesn’t go away is a sign that something is wrong. Continuing to bear weight on a hurt foot or engaging in the same motion that is causing the pain will most likely lead to serious injury.

Get the Gear: You can skip the fancy shorts or sports logo t-shirt but don’t skimp on quality footwear. Today, footwear is designed specifically for the motion that a particular sport requires. Having fitness shoes or sneakers that fit properly and support your foot where needed is one of the biggest precautions you can take to prevent sports injuries. Get professionally fitted by someone experienced with sport shoes.

Sweat the Small Stuff:  Some common foot problems that occur with exercise are blisters, shin splints, athlete’s foot, corns and calluses. Although none of these are major medical problems, don’t ignore them. For any of these or more serious pain and discomfort, make an appointment at our Reading office to see one of our podiatrists, George A. Abboud, D.P.M., Brian D. Tedesco, D.P.M., Carl Conui, D.P.M., and Kimberly Thurmond, D.P.M. by calling (781) 944-4044.

 



Contact Us

New England & Ankle Specialists

(781) 944-4044
30 New Crossing Road Suite 311 Reading, MA 01876